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Posts from the ‘Art and Nature’ Category

Book Review: The Laws Guide to Drawing Birds, written and illustrated by John Muir Laws

The latest book from California naturalist, artist, and educator John Muir Laws is a delight, with a potential audience far beyond what its title suggests.  The Laws Guide to Drawing Birds is not just about drawing birds or bird anatomy, though it addresses those topics thoroughly and adeptly.  It is, rather, a book about seeing nature more truly and getting over fear. Read more

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Climate Change: The Most Important Issue of Our Time, Summed Up in Cartoon Form

I always enjoy Bird and Moon‘s creative take on nature, but today’s new work by cartoonist Rosemary Mosco (a fellow alumna of the Field Naturalist program) is one I had to share:

There’s no way to put this gently: climate change is the most important issue of our time.  It is the most important moral issue.  The most important economic issue.  The most important ecological issue.

I’m glad to see climate change finally getting the attention it deserves in the media.  Now let’s seriously rethink our lifestyles and act already, shall we?

Connecting with Nature Through Art: You Don’t Have to Be an Artist!

Art and I have an uneasy relationship. I enjoy looking at art. I admire people who create original works. I often wish I could draw, or paint, or sculpt; I long for the artistic ability to capture the beauty I see in wild animals and plants. Every now and then I take a stab at sketching in my nature notebook ... but I always fall back on words to describe what I see. Writing is far easier, for me. It comes more naturally. Drawing is mildly scary. Painting or using pastels, or introducing color in any way? Terrifying!

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That’s No Spider!

Eeek!  Giant spiders have taken over the roof of the Seattle Center Armory, terrorizing visitors to the Space Needle!

… Or maybe not.  A Mental Floss blog post yesterday includes this photo of the trompe l’oeil painting created by artist Marlin Peterson:

seemingly three-dimensional giant daddylonglegs on the roof of a Seattle building

Artist Marlin Peterson’s painted giant daddylonglegs look like they’re going to walk right off the roof of the Seattle Center Armory. (from Marlin Peterson)

The painting is beautiful and well-executed and slightly creepy and awesome.  But the blog got one important point wrong: the giant painted critters aren’t spiders at all.  They’re daddylonglegs, also known as harvestmen.  Read more

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